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Law Changes and How Legal Benefits Can Help

Published July 13, 2022

More than 100 Laws were passed at the beginning of July which included minimum wage increases, animal protections, and even hunting on Sundays. While some may stand on opposite sides, it’s important that we all stand on the side of understanding. While these changes may not affect some as much as others, it’s important that everyone is protected.  

Most often, legal matters are tied to financial concerns, and employees need assistance with both. As we work together in offering resources that help provide protection, staying informed is key! While all legal plans are not created equally, it’s important to know you’re covered. Below, we’ve listed a few law changes that have taken effect:

School Safety  

  • School resources officers (SRO) are now required to be part of a threat assessment team for any public school that employs an SRO. If a school does not have an SRO, the chief local law enforcement officer must designate an officer to receive state school safety training and serve as liaison for the school administrator. (HB 873) 

Vehicle and Parking Law Changes 

  • Parking vehicles not capable of receiving an electric charge in a space clearly marked for charging electric vehicles is now prohibited, and subject to a civil penalty of no more than $25. (HB 450) 
  • Traffic incident management vehicles may now be equipped with flashing red or red and white secondary warning lights. (HB 793/SB 450) 

Tax Changes 

  • Beginning with tax year 2022, localities may provide tax exemptions or separate tax rates for any real property owned by a surviving spouse of a member of the armed forces who died in the line of duty. The spouse must occupy that property as a principal place of residence and may not remarry to receive the potential exemption/benefit. (HB 957)

While these changes may not be significant to some, staying informed and protected is extremely important. Having a legal plan provider ensures just that.  

Relax, you’re covered.  

NBC 12 Article